2018-10-10 / Home

Hundreds march through Cherry Hill streets to remember the Holocaust

By JAYNE JACOVA FELD Voice staff


Members of the Zinn family participated in the march. Pictured were (from left), Ellen, Steven, Abbie, 11, and Stephanie. Ellen, the child of survivors, tells her parents’ stories through the JCRC’s Raab/Goodwin Holocaust Museum & Education Center speaker series. Members of the Zinn family participated in the march. Pictured were (from left), Ellen, Steven, Abbie, 11, and Stephanie. Ellen, the child of survivors, tells her parents’ stories through the JCRC’s Raab/Goodwin Holocaust Museum & Education Center speaker series. Rosa Middle School eighth-grader Shivani Hirata walked with friends through sleepy Cherry Hill streets Sunday morning thinking about her grandmother’s chilling childhood stories of being forced to leave home and live in an internment camp along with other American citizens of Japanese descent during World War II.

Judy Patterson, a 70-year-old Somerdale resident, marched because she worries that the conditions that allowed for the mass slaughter of Jews and others in Eastern Europe some 75 years ago are rearing their ugly head in the present.

They were among hundreds who participated in the moving Sixth Annual March of Remembrance, a two-mile course from The Commons, Jewish Federation’s building at 1721 Springdale Road, to the Weinberg Jewish Community Campus, where a panel of local survivors, ages 89 to 91, told their stories. The diverse crowd included dogs, babies in strollers, some 20 members of the Cherry Hill Police Department led by Chief William Monaghan, local government officials, as well as groups representing schools, synagogues and the Plays and Players theater company.

As always, leading the pack were survivors—whose participation provides the strongest of visual messages of the promise that the lessons of the Holocaust are taken to heart. Another repeat feature that many found inspiring was unwavering support from neighboring Bethel Baptist Church. Members of the church held signs of support, waved and sang from their perch on the opposite side of the street from the Commons as participants marched past them.

“It’s inspiring to see the support from the community proving that Holocaust education and the lessons of tolerance and diversity are a true priority in South Jersey,” said Helen Kirschbaum, director of the JCRC’s Raab/Goodwin Holocaust Museum & Education Center, which is the beneficiary of the event.

Hirata, who was participating for the third year in a row, was proud that some 75 Rosa students, along with approximately 15 of their parents, came representing their school. “I do feel strongly that kids need to be learning about this and we have to teach future generations so we can learn and reflect and never do it again.”

The local survivors who took part in “This is Us: Connecting the Past and the Present” included Eric Bloch, Helene Bouton, Izador Einziger, Ernest Kaufman and Charles Middleberg.

For Marc Cohen, co-chair of the event with Lynne Warszawski, the survivors’ story was among the most touching parts of the event.

“The program ‘This is Us’ truly showed how we are one community and we learn from the example of generations to generations.”

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