2017-10-11 / Home

Hundreds join March of Remembrance to promote tolerance and diversity

By DAVID PORTNOE Voice Editor


March of Remembrance participants head out of The Commons at 1721 Springdale on their way to the Weinberg Jewish Community Campus. Over 400 people participated in the fifth annual event supporting the JCRC’s Raab/Goodwin Center. March of Remembrance participants head out of The Commons at 1721 Springdale on their way to the Weinberg Jewish Community Campus. Over 400 people participated in the fifth annual event supporting the JCRC’s Raab/Goodwin Center. An overcast, rainy day could not dampen the spirits of hundreds of people who came out on Sunday for the Fifth Annual March of Remembrance, sponsored by the JCRC’s Esther Raab Holocaust Museum and Goodwin Education Center. The March began at The Commons, 1721 Springdale Road, and ended at the Weinberg Jewish Community Campus at 1301 Springdale. After the March, there were film screenings of “The Statement that Revealed the Truth: Josiah DuBois, an American Holocaust Hero,” and “Better Together: Names Not Numbers.”

“The Statement that Revealed the Truth” was created by Rosa International Middle School students and won second place in a nationwide National History Day competition. “Better Together” was created by Kellman Brown Academy students and featured interviews with four local Holocaust survivors.


Among the proud marchers were twins Mia (top photo, left), and Ashley Salcedo, from Temple Emanuel’s religious school, together with their mother Amy. Getting ready to set out on the March were (bottom, from left), Cherry Hill Township Council President David Fleisher; Rabbi Jerome David of Temple Emanuel; Jewish Federation Vice President Harry Platt; Cherry Hill Councilwoman and March volunteer Carolyn Jacobs; and Federation CEO Jennifer Dubrow Weiss. Among the proud marchers were twins Mia (top photo, left), and Ashley Salcedo, from Temple Emanuel’s religious school, together with their mother Amy. Getting ready to set out on the March were (bottom, from left), Cherry Hill Township Council President David Fleisher; Rabbi Jerome David of Temple Emanuel; Jewish Federation Vice President Harry Platt; Cherry Hill Councilwoman and March volunteer Carolyn Jacobs; and Federation CEO Jennifer Dubrow Weiss. The March featured people of diverse ages and backgrounds. Also marching was a contingent of Cherry Hill Police officers, who participated on their day off. While the March was taking place, a group of congregants from Bethel Baptist Church on Springdale Rd., held up signs supporting the March.

Ashley Salcedo, an 11-yearold marcher from Temple Emanuel in Cherry Hill, walked with her twin sister Mia and mother Amy. She said that the March helped in remembering the people who died in the Holocaust. “This teaches me how to treat other people— to be nice to them and treat them well.”

Marcher Steven Davis, 46, of Cherry Hill, said that it is important to both remember and stand against hate. He said that it’s very important to educate young people. His wife is a Rosa Middle School teacher. “This is my small way of giving back,” he said.

The fact that there were so many young people on the March was not lost on Marc Cohen, event co-chair. He said that not only were there Rosa Middle School and Kellman Brown Academy contingents with a connection to the day’s program through their films, but several religious schools had groups participating in the March.

“L’dor V’dor (from generation to generation); this is a message that can never die. It is part of the fabric of being Jewish,” said Cohen about combatting hate and promoting diversity, not only in Southern New Jersey, but everywhere.

March Co-chair Carol Orwitz said, “I feel like every morning when I wake up, I am bombarded with news about more incidents of prejudice, bigotry and hatred. I know that through my volunteer work with the Raab/Goodwin Center, the most effective way to combat this is through education about the history and lessons of the Holocaust.” She added that the March is an important way for people to engage the community so they can learn what the Raab/Goodwin Center does and also give everyone the opportunity to stand in unity to promote a world of diversity and acceptance.

The March of Remembrance was timed to coincide with New Jersey’s Week of Respect, and at the conclusion of the program, those in attendance had an opportunity to sign a pledge to stand up for the other and to challenge bigotry. 

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